Film

The Five Weirdest Forgotten Classics Of Australian Cinema

When we do weird, we do pretty bloody weird.

The Five Weirdest Forgotten Classics Of Australian Cinema

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Amid the fierceness of the Mad Max: Fury Road trailer that dropped a couple of weeks ago, film obsessives would have spotted a sweet Australian cinema reference: a silver, psychotic, spiky echidna car, speeding along impaling soft bodies in the desert. That freaky, beautiful instance of cinematic design appeared originally in The Cars That Ate Paris, an early, oft-forgotten classic of Australian cinema that marked Peter Weir’s debut. Nice reference, George Miller.

The wide misconception of Australian film is that it’s mostly dark, documentary-style, greyscale tales. That’s sad, considering the depth and breadth of sheer crazy brilliance that Australian cinema has to offer. It’s a strange historical accident that as Mad Max went on to gain global fame and three sequels (so far), a raft of equally amazing films were left behind. Here are some of Australia’s best weird films, and the stories behind them.

Words by Lauren Carroll Harris.

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