Politics

A 12-Year-Old Girl On Nauru Has Tried To Set Herself On Fire

As our politicians fight amongst themselves, this happens.

Nauru offshore detention

We missed you too. Sign up to our newsletter, and follow us on Instagram and Twitter, so you always know where to find us.

This post contains mentions of self-harm.

A 12-year-old refugee is in hospital on Nauru after attempting to set herself on fire.

According to The Guardian, the girl sustained some injuries before family and friends intervened. She has reportedly attempted suicide on a number of other occasions, and was seen by a psychiatrist last week who recommended she be moved to Australia.

Last month, a 14-year-old girl was transferred from Nauru to Australia after dousing herself in petrol and attempting to set herself alight. A number of other asylum seekers have attempted suicide in this manner. In 2016, 23-year-old Omid Masoumali died after suffering third-degree burns to most of his torso.

On Monday, a critically ill 12-year-old boy who had refused to eat for 20 days was transferred to a Brisbane hospital. He reportedly weighed just 36kg and was so weak that he was unable to stand up or even sit.

Meanwhile, a 17-year-old girl is currently being treated inside the Nauru detention centre after refusing all food, fluids and medical treatment. Doctors say she is one of a number of children still on the island who are severely or critically unwell.

Earlier this month, George Newhouse, director of the National Justice Project, told Junkee that “we are very concerned about the health and welfare of children on Nauru, and if the current policy continues, I fear that a child might die there.”

In related news, Peter Dutton, the man who up until Tuesday was responsible for keeping these kids locked up, is currently mounting a challenge to become Prime Minister. I guess we get the politicians we deserve.

If you’d like to talk about any issues with your mental health and options getting long-term help, you can reach Lifeline on 13 11 14, or beyondblue on 1300 22 4636.

Feature image via Amnesty International.