Film

Siri Does Not Even Want A Bar Of Spike Jonze’s ‘Her’, Thankyou Very Much

Ask her about it. We dare you.

In Spike Jonze’s forthcoming Her, which is released in Australia on January 16, a hopelessly lonely romantic (Joaquin Phoenix) upgrades to a new intuitive and evolving operating system (Scarlett Johansson), and proceeds to fall in love with it.

The film is both tender and provoking, casting a powerfully close-to-home eye over our increasingly dependent relationship to technology, and the implications that might have for our relationships with each other. It’s funny, real, thoughtful and heartfelt, forcing the audience to question the fluid boundaries we’ve set up around what is and isn’t “right” in our pursuit of happiness — and presenting a delectable selection of trousers in the process.

The Atlantic praised Her as the best film of the year, “a film that transcends its own ingenuity to achieve something akin to wisdom”; The Hollywood Reporter called it “beguilingly sincere and touching in how it approaches loneliness and the compulsion to overcome it”; and the National Board of Review in America (where the movie was released last month) has named it 2013’s Best Film, and Spike Jonze the year’s Best Director.

But Siri, the “intelligent personal assistant and knowledge navigator” behind Apple’s iOS, has a bit of a problem with Her, its premise, and its titular character.

And don’t even get her started on your foolish gullibility.

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The jury’s still out on the man behind the voice, though.

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