Politics

Osher Gunsberg Won ‘Q&A’ By Looking Very Handsome While Advocating For Real Climate Activism

"63% of Australians understand that we absolutely have to do something about [climate change] in a hurry. The majority of those are also coalition voters. And yet it's not happening. There's a disconnect I just can't understand."

Osher Gunsberg on 'Q&A'

Osher Gunsberg, host of The Bachelor and long-time media darling, took to Q&A yesterday for a panel designed to exclusively talk about climate change, energy, and Australia’s future.

Straight out of the gate, Gunsberg started making passionate, plainly-put arguments for Australia’s need to combat the industries hurting the planet. And he did it all while looking extremely handsome.

First up, he argued that Australians are moving away from widespread consumption of meat, and that the market indicates that more Aussies are going vegetarian to help do their part for the future of life on the planet. “Peter’s don’t accidentally … make three flavours of vegan drumsticks for fun,” Gunsberg said. “They do it because it makes them money … The market is absolutely speaking, and [people] want to eat less meat.”

Later, Gunsberg was asked about whether climate science and “media literacy” should be taught more widely in schools, so that children can be prepared for the future of a world ravaged by climate change. “The government is so out of touch with the fact that [young people] will be voting in four years,” he said. “[Young people] transition from talking about, ‘what kind of Fury Road am I going to have to be fighting for my life on?’ and ‘Oh, have you seen this thing from snapchat?'”

From there, host Hamish MacDonald asked Gunsberg to comment on politicians’ habit of slamming young people for protesting. To which the man had a simple and snappy answer: “That’s because [those politicians] are completely ridiculous.

“63% of Australians understand that we absolutely have to do something about [climate change] in a hurry. The majority of those are also coalition voters. And yet it’s not happening. There’s a disconnect I just can’t understand.”

But the real corkers came at the end of the program, when the TV host was asked to reflect upon the use of Kyoto carryover credits. Kyoto carryover credits are a program by which emissions that a country did not release count towards their current targets — it’s a way of retroactively making it look like countries are doing better with their emissions than they actually are.

And Osher Gunsberg had one thing to say about that. According to him, using the credits is like “telling my second wife that I washed heaps of dishes in my first marriage so I don’t have to wash any now.”

Truly a king.