Politics

‘The Feed’ Investigates The Real Victims Of The Hong Kong Airport Protests: Aussie Tourists

Forget the protesters laying their lives on the line for democracy. The real heroes are the ones stuck in an airport for two hours.

The Feed -- Hong Kong

As you may well have heard, Hong Kong is currently in the grip of a series of massive democratic protests.

Initially intended to protest a bill which would allow the Hong Kong government to deport citizens to China and Taiwan, the protests have now been widened in scope. They’re about police brutality; about freedom from fascism and violence.

Moreover, the protests are no longer mere passive demonstrations. Earlier this month, the demonstrators shut down Hong Kong International Airport, causing widespread plane delays and general chaos.

Three or so months into these demonstrations, the protesters are getting restless and paranoid. Earlier this week, they assaulted a man they suspected of being a plain clothes policeman, and clashes with journalists and Hong Kong authorities are growing more common.

Basically, it’s a tense, difficult situation that shows no sign of coming to a comfortable conclusion. The protesters want nothing less than their freedom, and so far, the government hasn’t shown much sign of budging on that one.

But luckily, despite this tangled web of motivations, the folks over at The Feed have walked straight into the middle of the conflict, and interviewed the real victims.

No, not the protesters, putting their lives on the line for freedom. The real victims: Aussie tourists stranded in Hong Kong airport during the shutdown.

“My flight to the Maldives has been delayed for two days now,” says one of the travellers. “It’s like, Cathay Pacific? More like Cathay Pathetic.”

“Apparently the government are sending people from Hong Kong to China or Taiwan?” adds another. “They should just send them to Bali. It’s so relaxing there.”

“I don’t even know what they’re protesting,” one tourist finally admits. “It’s like, violence is way too much.”

You can watch the whole glorious and satirical sketch in its entirety here: